Nonviolent Communication (NVC) is a communication framework developed by psychologist Marshall Rosenberg, drawing largely from the humanistic psychology of Carl Rogers.
Focusing on three aspects of communication – empathy, self-empathy, and honest self-expression – the NVC framework provides a powerful set of communication tools that enable us to achieve:
• Greater levels of self-connection and mutual understanding
• Clarity when triggered
• A habit of responding rather than reacting
• Ease with resolving interpersonal conflict
• Greater confidence in communicating effectively

Characterized by a set of distinctions and practices to facilitate needs awareness and empathetic listening, NVC provides a framework for speaking and listening in ways that foster connection and understanding. The NVC framework is learnable, practical, and applicable in personal and professional contexts. Since the 1960s, NVC facilitators have produced positive outcomes in schools, refugee camps, conflict mediation, executive coaching, client-centered therapy, and leadership development.


Facilitator Joseph Redwood Martinez has integrated Nonviolent Communication as a core shared practice of the social enterprise he owns and operates in Phoenix, Arizona. He facilitates NVC learning and integration for organizations, individuals, and communities interested in collaborative communication. Recent clients include WikiMedia Deutschland, thinkfarm berlin, and Salt River Project. Joseph is available to facilitate a workshop in person or to provide remote tutorials on the following topics:

How to Listen (Empathetically): An Introduction to Nonviolent Communication
Our habitual pattern of communication is characterized by deflective listening: problem-solving, diagnosing, changing the subject, and so on. Empathetic listening, by way of contrast, is characterized by being present for another person without trying to change anything or project yourself onto them. The intent with empathetic listening is to hold a space for identifying the underlying unmet needs. In this workshop, we will look at the most common habitual reactions that block connection and then learn empathetic listening through experiential practice.

Empathic Presence: Deep Listening
In this experiential workshop, we will work in dyads to explore and deepen our capacity to be empathically present for another person. We will integrate NVC consciousness with somatic empathy and mindfulness to support a practice of deep listening.

Responding to Triggers with Self-Empathy
When we are triggered, we often experience palpable “initial feelings” – these are feelings often implicate the other and contain subtle blame, judgement, and criticism. “He makes me feel unappreciated.” “She made me feel taken for granted.” Instead of discrediting these initial feelings or saying that “you shouldn't feel this way” we can actually use this as a point of departure in our self-empathy process. The process is characterized by recognizing these initial feelings and then connecting through to the underlying feelings and needs. In this workshop, we will use triggers, “initial feelings,” and common complaints as starting points for the self-empathy process. The purpose of this workshop is to give a concrete and realistic framework for integrating NVC consciousness into daily life.

Empathy Group
In this facilitated empathy group, participants practice giving and receiving empathy in dyads and as a group. The empathy group is ideal for those who have already been introduced to NVC and are looking for a setting to practice, experience, and integrate NVC consciousness on a deeper level.

Other workshops: